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05-Jan-2020 07:32

I've tried to do my research before pestering the experts here, but I wanted to pick your brains. Quite honestly, a few things you mention kind of make me think that what you have is an American militia sword and not a Knights Templar sword.I've got a Horstmann/Weyersberg Knights Templar sword I'm hoping to put up for auction. Does the sword have the owner's name etched on the blade?Engraved at the center of the guard is a head on image of what is either a four petal lilly or a version of a maltese cross.On the blade itself, aside from the knight on the horse and the motto, are crossed banners, a maltese cross on what looks to be a shield, a traditional cross, and a simple cross (that looks more like a plus sign) on a seven pointed star. I don't know how to make photos smaller than 100 KB for posting here, but I'll look around to see what I can find.If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

My understanding is that the kings head was used until the 1883 merger -- creating Weyersberg Kirschbaum & Co. So my guess is the sword was made between 1843-1883. However, at some point the company was called the Horstmann Brothers Co. The bulk of Horstmann's common militia swords will have a knight's head pommel and a reeded (grooved) bone grip.--Photobucket worked, by the way, and somehow it reduced the size sufficiently to meet the limits here.Now, it said I had successfully uploaded the five files...Probably best not to post a link to an ongoing auction here, or in our classified section.Some war era Horstmann marked blades seem to have had the source mark ground off, or overstamped. Here is a page that shows Horstmann & Sons marks still being used during the war.

My understanding is that the kings head was used until the 1883 merger -- creating Weyersberg Kirschbaum & Co. So my guess is the sword was made between 1843-1883. However, at some point the company was called the Horstmann Brothers Co. The bulk of Horstmann's common militia swords will have a knight's head pommel and a reeded (grooved) bone grip.

--Photobucket worked, by the way, and somehow it reduced the size sufficiently to meet the limits here.

Now, it said I had successfully uploaded the five files...

Probably best not to post a link to an ongoing auction here, or in our classified section.

Some war era Horstmann marked blades seem to have had the source mark ground off, or overstamped. Here is a page that shows Horstmann & Sons marks still being used during the war.

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