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29-Oct-2019 16:26

The book Stand and Deliver [by Andrew Clark] predicted great things for you. I think at the time he wrote it, I was in Rocketman.

GM: When you left, you were kind of like the 'It' comic in Canada. I wasn't sure how I got that but I was quite honoured to have that.

And it's weird because, not to be pretentious but I really do wear like an old ratty baseball hat and dark sunglasses. Those are kinda fun, too, because it's kinda fun when people know that you're eating it. And so I copied a lot of cool artists like Ernie Chan and Bernie Wrightson and Jim Davis and people like that. And hopefully at this point with my art I'm kind of doing my own thing, which I know I am. I wake up in the morning and the first thing I do is, I'm doing a radio show now so I have to wake up in the morning every day and do eight radio bits. HW: It's the drive-home show from three to seven in the evening. I usually do usually between two minutes to five or six minutes. Because movies you have directors and everywhere else you've got programming people and executives and producers and network people. HW: I try and limit it to about four months worth of weekends in a year. I don't want to be like a road warrior guy where I'm just on the road all year. GM: Has your act changed substantially since you left Canada?

GM: Nobody's ever come up to you and said, "Hey, man, thanks to you I'm now killing people." HW: Exactly. HW: Oh yeah, I can't go outside without getting it. And there are a lot of nights it doesn't work at all but you know what? I certainly tried purposely to not get absorbed too much from anybody else. But when I do see someone I like, I really enjoy it. Do you have influences there or is that the same sort of philosophy? Because the way I taught myself to draw was by copying comic books. I've only been on the air for about a month and a half. GM: What's the thing you like most about standup and hate the most about it? It's one of the few art forms where you just have total liberty.

I think they're still a little bit mystified at how I've made a career out of, "What? HW: What's interesting is, yeah, I'm really revered in the States. And what's kind of a little bit of a sore spot with me with Canada, I'm not bitter about it but it hurts emotionally a little bit that it's weird, when I left I never really got invited back that much. Vancouver's invited me for the festival and so has Montreal. I've never really been asked back to play in Toronto. I mean, most of the huge comedy stars are the ones making giant comedy movies. They're not just roles that kinda went by the wayside. I mean, I've done nights where the whole show is just riffing with the crowd. The only weird thing is I don't know where I'm escaping to (laughs). And I'll go away and these top-notch artists will do drawings. It's a good way because I've had the luxury of doing really kind of funny roles and somehow I've managed to get into a lot of roles that have kind of stayed in people's minds. Sometimes you'll get a real great energy from the crowd and I'll riff like 50 percent of it, sometimes more. And then I come home and I continue to dig the escape tunnel under my house. Then they wanted me to come on as the writer and the director as well. I'll do rough sketches and say this is the direction I want to go and this is the look and the feel.

I think they're still a little bit mystified at how I've made a career out of, "What?

HW: What's interesting is, yeah, I'm really revered in the States. And what's kind of a little bit of a sore spot with me with Canada, I'm not bitter about it but it hurts emotionally a little bit that it's weird, when I left I never really got invited back that much. Vancouver's invited me for the festival and so has Montreal. I've never really been asked back to play in Toronto.

I mean, most of the huge comedy stars are the ones making giant comedy movies.

They're not just roles that kinda went by the wayside. I mean, I've done nights where the whole show is just riffing with the crowd. The only weird thing is I don't know where I'm escaping to (laughs). And I'll go away and these top-notch artists will do drawings.

It's a good way because I've had the luxury of doing really kind of funny roles and somehow I've managed to get into a lot of roles that have kind of stayed in people's minds. Sometimes you'll get a real great energy from the crowd and I'll riff like 50 percent of it, sometimes more. And then I come home and I continue to dig the escape tunnel under my house. Then they wanted me to come on as the writer and the director as well. I'll do rough sketches and say this is the direction I want to go and this is the look and the feel.

It's going to really widen your fan base and a lot of people are going to see it." And taking that I kinda went, "You know, I've played a guy on Mars, I've played a cop drinking pee, I've played a serial killer in There's Something About Mary. They are just roles." And so I kind of justified it that way. I look back on it and I've had a lot of kids come up to me in the streets and go, "Hey, man, thanks to you I got into the bud." I'm like, "I don't really like that." So it was a bit of a mixed thing for me. GM: With your unique face, you must get recognized a lot. GM: You're not alienating people with your standup. I want to just totally create my own thing." GM: You're not being political or anything like that. I mean, I do touch on political things a little bit, but when I do I keep them fun. Because I feel like I get the answer right then and there. It's like drowning and you've got to claw your way to the top to get air. Unless they're subliminal and I'm not aware of them. Unless I'm working with them at the club I honestly do stay away from that. You can say whatever you want and move however you want and react however you want. GM: But would you describe it generally as the same type of material? But back then I wasn't talking about things like 9/11 or things like that. GM: I interrupted you about what you do on an average day.