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Well-invested bonuses provided the capital for Halpert to open her own business.

In November 1926, Halpert and business partner Berthe (Bea) Kroll Goldsmith opened Our Gallery at 113 West 13th Street for the purpose of promoting a group of progressive American artists, many of whom were friends of Edith and Samuel Halpert.

Writings by Edith Gregor Halpert consist of articles on American folk art, speeches, and short stories; also included are her school notebooks and "Daily Thoughtlets" compiled at age seventeen.

All writings by other authors are on art subjects, and most are texts or introductions for exhibition catalogs.

There is an unprocessed addition to this collection dating circa 1970 of a single financial/legal document.

The Downtown Gallery records constitute 109.56 linear feet on 167 reels of microfilm.

A copy of the program about Sheeler, along with the "tails out" material, is also on videocassette.

The Downtown Gallery was established in 1926 as Our Gallery and operated under the name Downtown Gallery from 1927 until 1973.

Audiovisual materials are 16-mm motion picture films of the Westinghouse Broadcasting Corporation television series, , produced between 19 in association with Jensen Productions.

An additional 16-mm motion picture film includes "tails out" footage of Charles Sheeler at home and at work, circa 1950.

The remaining series are organized into subseries that reflect either a function or specific record type, and the arrangement of each is explained in the detailed series descriptions.

Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.

The Downtown Gallery was established in 1926 as Our Gallery and operated under the name Downtown Gallery from 1927 until 1973.

Audiovisual materials are 16-mm motion picture films of the Westinghouse Broadcasting Corporation television series, , produced between 19 in association with Jensen Productions.

An additional 16-mm motion picture film includes "tails out" footage of Charles Sheeler at home and at work, circa 1950.

The remaining series are organized into subseries that reflect either a function or specific record type, and the arrangement of each is explained in the detailed series descriptions.

Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.

Nineteenth-century material consists of items acquired by Edith Gregor Halpert for research purposes or to document works of art in the gallery's inventory.